24 February 2021 - ENGLISH WORDS THAT HAVE BEEN LOST

 

ENGLISH WORDS 

THAT HAVE BEEN LOST

 

G'day folks,

Welcome to some English words that have lost their use.

 


 boreism


n

1833 -1839

behaviour of a boring person

The professor, while brilliant, was afflicted by boreism when lecturing. 

 

boscaresque

adj

1734 -1734

picturesque; scenically wooded

Despite northern England's industrial pollution, parts of it remain boscaresque. 

 

brabeum

n

1675 -1675

reward or prize

Without some brabeum, the students will have no incentive to work harder. 

 

brephophagist

n

1731 -1875

one who eats babies

The character Fat Bastard is a disgustingly obese Scottish brephophagist. 

 

brochity

n

1623 -1678

projecting or crooked quality of teeth

His parents later regretted that they did not correct his brochity in his youth. 

 

bromography

n

1860 -1860

a treatise on food

It's not enough to write a bromography - today's celebrity chefs need to be on TV! 

 

bubulcitate

v

1623 -1678

to act as a cowherd; to cry like a cowherd

When their cat went missing, they were on the street bubulcitating for weeks. 

 

buccellation

n

1657 -1731

act of dividing into small morsels

The buccellation and apportionment of their rations was the subject of heated argument. 

 

bumposopher

n

1834 -1886

one learned in bumps; a phrenologist

Craniology has progressed greatly since the days of bumposophers. 

 

cacatory

adj

1684 -1753

accompanied by loose bowels

For the diners, the effects of the chicken cacciatore, alas, were cacatory. 

 

cacozealous

adj

1656 -1696

imitating badly; poorly affected

Her cacozealous attempt at mimicking her boss bordered on being offensive. 

 


 Clancy's comment: Mm ... some of these are extraordinary. 


 I'm ...