24 September 2019 - PARQUE TRIANON, BRAZIL





PARQUE TRIANON, BRAZIL

G'day folks,

This park feels like a lush little jungle full of wildlife nestled within São Paulo. 

 

This city park is so lush, you can easily forget you’re in the middle of a bustling metropolis. It feels like a small slice of the jungle, conveniently placed within São Paulo.

 


  Numerous trails wind around the park. The paths lead you among all kinds of native species of palms and trees such as the iron wood, jequitibá, zebra wood, Nectaranda, and of course the “Pau Brasil” (the Brasilwood tree), which the country is named after.

 

 The park is also home to a surprising variety of native wildlife. Over 29 species of birds have been reported within the park, including numerous hummingbirds and even parrots such as the white-eyed parakeet and the maroon-bellied parakeet. There are also some resident two-toed sloths; however, these are much harder to see due to the dense foliage.





 You’ll find some human-made attractions, too. A number of sculptures with a Greco-Roman theme, such as a sublime dryad and a surreal faun, are sprinkled throughout the park. There are also benches where you can hunker down with a book or simply sit and watch the world go by.

Clancy's comment: Sounds like a great place to chill out, and take photographs of wildlife. 
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23 September 2019 - HUTA ETELKA - ABANDONED IRON FACTORY IN SLOVAKIA


HUTA ETELKA - ABANDONED
 IRON FACTORY IN SLOVAKIA

G'day folks,

Welcome to another abandoned building perched along the outskirts of an idyllic village in Slovakia. 

Set in the idyllic rolling hills of the Rožňava District is Nižná Slaná, a tiny village that resembles the many other charming villages in the area. And perched along the outskirts of the tiny town is Huta Etelka, an old iron factory home to the area’s prized blast furnace that’s now little more than dilapidated ruins.



Ironmongery boomed within the region during the 19th century. Count Emanuel Andrássa built this factory and its blast furnace in 1867 to keep up with the demands. The Count named the furnace, which replaced two older ones, after his mother.

The great furnace melted iron ores from nearby mines. The metal was then shipped off throughout Slovakia until the small factory hit its decline. It closed in 1907 and a newer, bigger iron factory was built nearby.




Sadly, time has not been kind to the historic structure, which some see as a monument to the region’s metallurgical past. Its current owners are unwilling to salvage the factory, and thieves continue to loot bits of metal and scraps from within its walls.

But all hope may not be lost. A local nonprofit hopes to rebuild and restore the ruins and transform the space into a mining museum.

Clancy's comment: Mm ... You might be wondering if I'm obsessed with abandoned buildings. No, but it amazes me that so many of them exist, and have been left to rot. Surely there is another use for them? B&B? Writer's haven?

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22 September 2019 - PICTURES THAT ROCK AND ROLL





PICTURES THAT 
ROCK AND ROLL

G'day folks,

It's time to check out some clever pictures that move.




































Clancy's comment: I loved the glass of wine. So clever. 

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21 September 2019 - MARINE PARK SALT MARSH IN BROOKLYN, NEW YORK


MARINE PARK SALT MARSH
IN BROOKLYN, NEW YORK

G'day folks,

This preserved wilderness hides the remains of a colonial grain mill used to feed George Washington's troops. 

 

Prospect Park may be the most famous park in Brooklyn, but it’s Marine Park that holds the honor of being the borough’s largest. The north section is home to a large grassy field and the park’s beloved basketball courts (where a young Chuck Schumer was a regular), while to the east is a golf course. But the biggest section of this city park is actually its salt marsh, a 530-acre nature preserve.

 

 

 The Salt Marsh Nature Center consists of two hiking trails that wind through acres upon acres of wetlands and grasslands. The marsh is home to roughly 325 species of birds like warblers, sparrows, and pheasants; 50 species of butterflies; and 100 species of fish. There’s even a platform where you can see two mated ospreys who have nested there for several years (osprey mate for life).

 

 Just behind the nature center at the north of the marsh, you’ll see a set of wood pilings. These are the remnants of the first tide-powered mill in the U.S., which was used to grind corn, grain, and flour for General George Washington’s army during the American Revolution, and later by the Hessians when the British captured Brooklyn. 

 

 

 The mill operated until 1889 when it was sold to William Whitney, who used the land to build a country estate for his racehorses. It was later donated to the city, and in 1932 renovations began, starting with the walls and foundations. Unfortunately, the historic mill burned down in 1935 after the exterior was restored, a possible victim of arson.

 

Clancy's comment: Sounds like a great place for photographers seeking wildlife.

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20 September 2019 - KNICKEBEIN #12 IN MAULBURG, GERMANY


KNICKEBEIN #12 IN MAULBURG, GERMANY

G'day folks,

Obscured within a ring of trees, this abandoned World War II relic hides on a German hillside. Amid fields and groves in the southwestern corner of Germany, close to the Swiss and French borders, lies an enormous concrete ring overgrown with trees and shrubbery.

 

 

It’s what remains of a massive structure developed by the German Luftwaffe (Air Force) during the “Battle of the Beams” in World War II. Codenamed Knickebein (German for “crooked leg”), its purpose was to guide bombers toward their targets in Britain during their nightly raids by means of modulated radio signals.










About 13 of these aerial antennas were erected along the channel coast and inland. Measuring 312 feet in diameter and about 100 feet tall, the one here at Maulburg (#12) was the tallest one, along with Stollberg (#2) and Kleve (#4).




 After the war, a French commando demolished the antenna, leaving only the concrete foundation in place. The concrete ring held the rails on which the antenna could be rotated and aligned toward its target. A small explanatory display board in the vicinity of the circle shows an old photograph of the antenna.

 

 Clancy's comment: They were obviously big structures but not much is left.

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19 September 2019 - INSPIRING QUOTES


 INSPIRING QUOTES

G'day folks,

It's time for some more of those inspiring quotes.






















Clancy's comment: Yep, all good.

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