18 February 2016 - MORE BRITISH SLANG




MORE BRITISH SLANG

G'day folks,

Welcome to some more slang from the UK. There are some rippers here.



Jammy - If you are really lucky or flukey, you are also very jammy. It would be quite acceptable to call your friend a jammy b****rd if they won the lottery. 

Jimmy - Actually short for Jimmy Riddle. i.e. I'm off for a Jimmy Riddle. This is Cockney rhyming slang for piddle

John Thomas - Yet another word for a blokes willy! I always felt a bit sorry for people who were actually called John Thomas. What were their parents thinking? 

Jolly - You hear people use this in all sorts of ways, but basically it means very. So "jolly good" would mean very good. A common exception is where you hear people say "I should jolly well think so!" which is more to emphasise the point. 

Keep your pecker up - This is one way of saying keep your chin up. Use with caution as in some places your pecker is also your willy

Khazi - Another word for the toilet. Our version of your bathroom

Kip - A short sleep, forty winks, or a snooze. You have a kip in front of the telly on a Sunday afternoon. 

Knackered - The morning after twenty pints and the curry, you'd probably feel knackered. Another way to describe it is to say you feel shagged. Basically worn out, good for nothing, tired out, knackered. 

Knees up - If you're having a knees up, you're going to a dance or party

Knob - Yet another word for your willy

Knock off - To knock something off is to steal it, not to copy it! 

Knock up - This means to wake someone up. Although it seems to have an altogether different meaning in the USA! At one time, in England, a chap was employed to go round the streets to wake the workers up in time to get to work. He knew where everyone lived and tapped on the bedroom windows with a long stick, and was known as a "knocker up". He also turned off the gas street lights on his rounds. Another meaning of this phrase, that is more common these days, is to make something out of odds and ends. For example my Dad knocked up a tree house for us from some planks of wood he had in the garage, or you might knock up a meal from whatever you have hanging around in the fridge. 

Knockers - Another word for breasts

Knuckle sandwich - If somebody offers you a knuckle sandwich you'd be best to decline the offer and leave at the next convenient moment. It isn't some British culinary delight - they're about to thump you in the face

Leg it - This is a way of saying run or run for it. Usually said by kids having just been caught doing something naughty. Well it was when I was a kid! 

Left, right and centre - If you have been looking left, right and centre, it means you have been searching all over

Love bite - You call them hickies - the things you do to yourself as a youngster with the vacuum cleaner attachment to make it look like someone fancies you! 

Lurgy - If you have the lurgy it means you are ill, you have the Flu. Don't go near people with the lurgy in case you get it! 

Luvvly-jubbly - Clearly another way of saying lovely. Made famous by the TV show Only Fools and Horses. 

-ly - These are two letters that seem to be left off words in America. I never heard anyone say something was "really nice" or "really cool", they would say real nice and real cool. We would be sent to the back of the class for grammar like that! 

Mate - Most chaps like to go to the pub with their mates. Mate means friend or chum

Momentarily - As you come into land at an American airport and the announcement says that you will be landing momentarily, look around to see if anyone is sniggering. That will be the Brits! I never did figure out why they say this. Momentarily to us means that something will only happen for an instant - a very short space of time. So if the plane lands momentarily will there be enough time for anyone to get off? Weird! 



Clancy's comment: Well, mate, stop sniggering, or I'll give you a knuckle sandwich. 

I'm ...