3 April 2013 - THE WHITE HOUSE


THE WHITE HOUSE

WASHINGTON DC, USA

G'day guys,
Today I bring you a famous building, located at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington DC, 20500 - The White House.  For some reason, I was always intrigued by this building when  I worked in Washington DC many years ago. My first visit was amazing. 

I might have told you what happened on that visit. Security back in the 1970's was not as touchy as it is today. So, being the first visitor for the day, I reached across the rope barrier and placed a finger on the President's desk. I then smiled and strolled out. What happened next? Mm ... two statue-looking marines stood either side of the door outside, and one of them made a quiet comment, 'I wouldn't do that again if I was you.' Blushing, I apologised and scurried off, still feeling chuffed. Today I'd be arrested. 
 

The White House is the official residence and principal workplace of the President of the United States, and the building was based on the project of Villa Rotunda by Palladio. It is Renaissance or neoclassical Greek Revival in America, which was designed and built by George Washington in 1790. James Hoban's Irish architect who designed the White House. President George Washington, along with the designer of the city, Pierre Charles L'Enfant, chose the site it would be built. Through an architect competition, was elected a native of Dublin, who won the gold medal for the presentation of the design we know today.

The design of the White House was inspired by the Leinster House (Dublin), and Castletown House (Celbridge), both in the style of Palladian architecture. As its name implies, is a white building located on Pennsylvania Avenue No. 1600 (Pennsylvania Avenue) northwest of Washington D. C. Designed during the first term of George Washington, the building was opened by John Adams in 1800. Formally, this building received the names of Presidential Palace, the Executive Mansion, until President Theodore Roosevelt called it "The White House."



Construction began with the laying of the cornerstone on 13 October 1792. A diary kept by the building commissioner of the District of Columbia recorded the bases of the main residence were dug by slaves. The foundations were also built by slave labor. Most other work in the house were made by immigrants, many still without citizenship. Most of the brick and plaster work was carried out by Irish and Italian immigrants. The initial construction took place over a period of eight years, with a reported cost of $232,371.83 ($ 2.4 million in 2005). Although still unfinished, the White House was ready for occupancy on or about November 1, 1800. When it was completed the porous sandstone walls were covered with a mixture of lime, rice glue, casein and lead, giving the house its familiar color and name. 

The original residence is the center area of the White House amid the two colonnades, which now serve to connect the offices called the East Wing and West Wing. The executive residence is where the president lives and rooms for ceremonies and official entertaining. The State Floor of the residence includes the East Room, Green Room, the Blue Room, Red Room, the State Dining Room, the Family Dining Room and the lobby lounge. The ground floor consists of the Oval Office of diplomats, is a reception room, there is also the Map Room, China Room, the Vermeil Room, Presidential Library, the main kitchen and other offices. 

The second floor is the family residence. Includes The Yellow Oval Room, leaving the balcony Truman and several bedrooms including the master bedroom, The Lincoln Bedroom, the Queen's bedroom and two bedrooms, a kitchenette and a private dressing area. The third floor consists of the White House solarium, games room, linen room, a Diet Kitchen, and another extra room. In the early twentieth century, new buildings were constructed on both sides of the house, to accommodate workers of the president. The West Wing is a three-storey main building and several basement levels, which stands the President's Office, The Oval (The Oval Office) and offices of the important members of his administration. It also includes a room for meetings of the Presidential Cabinet (Cabinet Room), The Situation Room (Situation Room).



The other members of the Executive Branch including those working for Vice President have their offices in the building directly west of the West Wing of the White House, called the Old Executive Building, and each cabinet secretary has their own administrative buildings of his department. 

The East Wing is a two-storey structure on the eastern side of the Executive Residence. The east wing houses the offices of the First Lady, and Social Secretary who receives personal correspondence, and other members of the White House staff have offices here. The east wing also includes the White House theater, the visitor center at the entrance, and the columns eastern corridor that connects the body of the West Wing to the residence. In front of the colonnade is the garden called the Jacqueline Kennedy Garden. To walk pass the columns you enter the main floor of the White House residence.


Clancy's comment: Go and visit this house if you ever have the chance. You might even see my fingerprint on the President's desk.
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