17 April 2018 - LOST WORDS


LOST WORDS

G'day folks,

Here are some words that seem to have disappeared from use.


acrasial
adj
1851 -1851
ill-regulated; ill-tempered
The acrasial judge was known for her rants against younger lawyers. 

addecimate
v
1612 -1755
to tithe
They addecimated regularly but were not otherwise known for their charity. 

adimpleate
v
1657 -1657
to fill up
The new technique adimpleates the cans with milk through injection. 

adnascentia
npl
1706 -1731
root-like branches that sprout into the earth from a plant's stem
Every winter, the adnascentia would shift around, destroying the lawn's even texture. 

aeipathy
n
1847 -1853
continued passion; an unyielding disease
Her aeipathy for stamp collecting bordered at times on the pathological. 

affictitious
adj
1656 -1656
feigned; counterfeit
The forger was caught despite his masterfully-crafted affictitious signatures. 

affuage
n
1753 -1847
right to cut wood in a forest for family fire
The family's right of affuage ensured they would have enough wood for winter. 

agonarch
n
1656 -1656
judge of a contest or activity
Our competition will require six agonarchs to ensure fairness. 



agonyclite
n
1710 -1710
member of a heretical sect that stood rather than kneeled while praying
Agonyclites must have had hardy feet to endure their services. 

airgonaut
n
1784 -1784
one who journeys through the air
Balloonists, skydivers and other airgonauts are all a little mad, if you ask me. 

alabandical
adj
1656 -1775
barbarous; stupefied from drink
His behaviour after the party was positively alabandical. 

albedineity
n
1652 -1652
whiteness
The monotonous albedineity of the snow-covered field was blinding. 

alogotrophy
n
1753 -1853
excessive nutrition of part of body resulting in deformity
Was he born with that huge head, or is it the result of alogotrophy? 

amandation
n
1656 -1755
act of sending away or dismissing
His rude amandation of his guests earned him a reputation for curtness. 

amarulence
n
1731 -1755
bitterness; spite
After losing her job to a less qualified man, she was full of amarulence. 

amorevolous
adj
1670 -1670
affectionate; loving
Our father, though amorevolous, could be a strict taskmaster at times. 

antipelargy
n
1656 -1731
reciprocal or mutual kindness; love and care of children for their parents
Having never received any antipelargy, they wrote their daughter out of the will. 

apanthropinization
n
1880 -1880
withdrawal from human concerns or the human world
His life as a hermit in the woods was characterized by apanthropinization. 

aporrhoea
n
1646 -1880
a bodily emanation; an effluvium
The evening's revelries were followed by an unfortunate episode of aporrhoea. 

aquabib
n
1731 -1883
water-drinker
I was never much of an aquabib, and always preferred harder libations. 

archigrapher
n
1656 -1656
principal or head secretary or clerk
The archigrapher efficiently designated transcription duties to her underlings. 

archiloquy
n
1656- 1656
first part of a speech
We stopped paying attention during his talk due to his monotonous archiloquy. 




aretaloger
n
1623 -1656
braggart; one who boasts about his own accomplishments
While he seemed nice at first, he turned out to be a loudmouthed aretaloger. 

artigrapher
n
1753 -1753
writer or composer of a grammar; a grammarian
Today's prescriptivists are no better than the artigraphers of the Renaissance. 

ascoliasm
n
1706 -1753
boys' game of beating each other with gloves or leather while hopping
If you think bullies are bad today, look at brutal games of the past like ascoliasm. 


Clancy's comment: Mm ... Any wonder they have disappeared? Aquabib? Wow!

I'm ...