30 January 2014 - DALE CARNEGIE


DALE CARNEGIE


G'day folks,

Welcome to some tips from a famous man who has inspired millions - Dale Carnegie. Who was he?

Dale Breckenridge Carnegie, born on 24th November, 1888- 1st November, 1955 was a highly acclaimed American writer, professor and the also the founder of courses such as salesmanship, public speaking, self-improvement and interactive skills. He was born in an impoverished family in Maryville, Missouri. Carnegie harboured a strong love and passion for public speaking from a very early age and was very proactive in debate in high school. Carnegie went to the Warrensburg State Teachers College and later onwards became a salesman for Armour and Company in Nebraska. He also moved to New York in the pursuit of a career in acting and gave classes in public speaking at the Young Men’s Christian Association. 

Consequently, he began to form classes of his own and also started to work on writing pamphlets, which would eventually be published as books. 

Carnegie was of the opinion that the quickest and most effective way to build up self-confidence and self-esteem is through public speaking and interaction. 

During the early 1930’s, he was renowned and very famous for his books and a radio program. When How to Win Friends and Influence People was published in 1930, it became an instant success and subsequently became one of the biggest bestsellers of all time. It sold more than 10 million copies in many different languages. It also increased the demand for further literary work from him and also to give lectures. Therefore, he began work as a newspaper columnist and formed the Dave Carnegie Institute for Effective Speaking and Human Relations, with several branches globally. Fortunately for Carnegie, he managed to live to see the day, when his name was associated with self-help to success that he so actively advocated and promoted. 



Carnegie loved teaching others to climb the pillars of success. His valuable and tested advice was used in many domains and has been the inspiration of many famous people’s success. His book, How To Win Friends and Influence People remains one of the most commercially famous books, primarily because of the colorful illustrations and simple well-constructed rules. The most famous and cited maxims in the book are “Believe that you will succeed, and you will,” and “Learn to love, respect and enjoy other people.”



TEN TOP TIPS

1. Create your own emotions.


“If you want to be enthusiastic, act enthusiastic.”


Emotions work backwards too. You can use that to your advantage. If you are stuck in a negative emotion then you can often shake it off. Change your body – how you move, sit and stand – and act as you would like to feel. Enthusiasm and other positive emotions are much more useful and pleasurable for everyone in an interaction. Because…


2. It’s not so much about the logical stuff.


“When dealing with people, remember you are not dealing with creatures of logic, but creatures of emotion.”


This is so key. Logic is good but in the end, in interactions and in life, we are emotional creatures. We send and receive emotions from other people. That is one reason why body language and voice tonality is often said be up to 93% of communication. Now, those numbers were for some specific situations but I still believe that these two ways of communication are very, very important.


The body language and the voice tonality is a bit like the rest of the iceberg, the great mass below the tip of the words we use. Those two things communicate how we are feeling and give indication to what we are thinking. And that’s why it’s important to be able to change how you feel. To be in a positive mood while interacting. Because that will have a great impact on how you say something and how you use your body. And those two things will have a big impact on your results and relationships.


3. Three things you are better off avoiding.


“Any fool can criticize, condemn, and complain but it takes character and self control to be understanding and forgiving.”


Now these things may not be easy to avoid all together. Much of our interactions and perhaps even bonds are created and maintained through those three negative C’s. There is a sort of twisted pleasure in criticising, condemning and complaining. It might make you feel more important and like a better person as you see yourself as a victim or as you condemn other people’s behaviour. 


But in the end these three C’s are negative and limiting to your life. Bringing up negative stuff and wallowing in it will lower your mood, motivation and general levels of wellbeing. And this can trap you in a negative spiral of complaining, complaining with other complainers and always finding faults in your reality.


You will also be broadcasting and receiving negative emotions. And people in general want to feel good. So this can really put an obstacle in the way for your interactions or relationships. 




4. What is most important?


“The royal road to a man’s heart is to talk to him about the things he treasures most.”


Classic advice. Don’t talk too much about yourself and your life. Listen to other people instead. However, if they ramble on and on, if they don’t reciprocate and show and interest in your life then you don’t have to stay. 


Some things people may treasure the most include ideas, children, a special hobby and the job. And…


5. Focus outward, not inward.


“You can make more friends in two months by becoming interested in other people than you can in two years by trying to get other people interested in you.”


A lot of people use the second, far less effective way. It is appealing because it’s about instant gratification and about ME, ME, ME! The first way – to become interested in people – perhaps works better because it make you a pleasant exception and because the law of reciprocity is strong in people. As you treat people, they will treat you. Be interested in them and they will be interested in you.


I would like to add that one hard thing about this can be to be genuinely interested in the other guy/gal. Your genuine interest is projected though your body language and tonality. So, just waiting for the other person to stop talking so you can talk again isn’t really genuine interest. And that may shine through. And so your interactions will suffer.


6. Take control of your emotions.


“The person who seeks all their applause from outside has their happiness in another’s keeping.”


It wrote about this problem a few days ago in 9 Great Ways to Make Yourself Absolutely Miserable. And it basically consist of being too reliant or dependent on external validation from other people. External validation is something someone communicates to you that tells you that you are person of value. That you, for example, are pretty, smart or successful.


This leaves much of your emotions in the hands of other people. It becomes an emotional rollercoaster. One day you feel great. The next day you feel like just staying in bed.


But if you fill that inner cup of validation for yourself instead then you take over the wheel. Now you’re driving, now you control how you feel. You can still appreciate compliments of course, but you aren’t dependent on them.


This will make you more emotionally stable and enables you to cultivate and build your emotional muscles in a more controlled way. You can for instance help yourself to become more optimistic or enthusiastic more of the time. This stability and growth can be big help in your relationships.




7. No, they are not holding you back.


“Instead of worrying about what people say of you, why not spend time trying to accomplish something they will admire.”

 
This may feel disappointing. It can also be liberating. It helps you remove inner obstacles that are you holding yourself back.


As you, bit by bit or in one big swoop, release those inner brakes you become more of yourself. You become more confident, you have a better chance at success, and you will feel more positive feelings and less negative ones. All these things can give a big boost to your interactions and help you sharpen those social skills.


8. So, what’s in it for me?


“There is only one way… to get anybody to do anything. And that is by making the other person want to do it.”


If you want someone to do something then will they care about your motivation for getting this thing done? Perhaps. Often they will not have that great of an interest in what you want out of something. 


They want to know what they will get out of it. So, for the both of you to get what you want out of something tell that person what’s in it for him/her. And try to be genuine and positive about it. A reason for them to do it delivered in a lame, half-assed manner may not be so persuasive. And so you both lose.


9. How to win an argument.


“The only way to get the best of an argument is to avoid it.”


Getting two egos wrapped up in an argument, having two sides defending their positions desperately, will not improve relationships. You are more likely to feel negative feelings towards each other long after the argument is over. And so you both wallow in negativity and you both lose. When possible, just avoiding unnecessary arguments is a win-win situation.




10. It’s about more than your words.


“There are four ways, and only four ways, in which we have contact with the world. We are evaluated and classified by these four contacts: what we do, how we look, what we say, and how we say it.”




Think about how you feel because that will be reflected out into the world. And the world will often reflect back something similar.




Clancy's comment: He makes a lot of sense, eh? Common sense in the end, but it ain't that common.

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