14 December 2019 - ANCIENT RUINS OF LOROPENI - 1,000 YEARS OLD.


ANCIENT RUINS OF LOROPENI 
- 1,000 YEARS OLD -

G'day folks,

These mysterious 1,000-year-old walls have revealed little about their past. 

 

These stone walls have stood for at least 1,000 years, towering above an otherwise flat territory. As of yet, the ruins have revealed little about their past, as much of the archaeological site has yet to be excavated.





The walls that stretched around the 119,800-square-foot site once guarded a fortress. It’s believed the fort was used by the Lohron or Koulango peoples, who were part of the powerful trans-Saharan gold trade.

The settlement reached its peak between the 14th and 17th centuries, which were toward the end of the trans-Saharan gold trade’s prime. The site was abandoned sometime in the 19th century, and has largely been left to nature’s whims.




Already, bits of the settlement have been lost to time. Centuries of wind, rain, and bushfires have weakened the walls that remain.




In 2009, the ruins of LoropĂ©ni were declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It’s the first World Heritage Site within Burkina Faso, and it’s hoped this prestigious title will fuel some funding for further research and excavations.


Clancy's comment: I'd love to know what happened there so long ago.

I'm ...







13 December 2019 - INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR ENTRIES


INTERNATIONAL LANDSCAPE 
PHOTOGRAPHER 
OF THE YEAR ENTRIES

G'day folks,

Bask in the breathtaking glory of nature captured in 2018 all around the world. Here are some of the best award-winning and noteworthy photographs submitted to the 5th annual International Landscape Photographer Of The Year competition.

In this photo gallery, you will find everything starting from the arctic tundra blanketed in a thick cloak of snow to the golden, minimalist desert dunes, and everything in-between. Everyone will surely find a personal favorite, as the variety of locations and the range of artistic styles is endless.





















Clancy's comment: So good! I love the shot of the wave. Oh, did you ever wonder what extraordinary efforts these photographers went to just to snap these shots? I always do, and I sure appreciate their work.

I'm ...







12 December 2019 - BEEKEEPING SCHOOL IN PARIS


BEEKEEPING SCHOOL IN PARIS

G'day folks,

Paris as you know, is like a jewel box, hiding endless little gems; another of which I’m going to share with you today, nestled in the iconic Jardin du Luxembourg. 

Begin by finding the south west entrance to the gardens on Rue d’Assas, near Hemingway’s old stomping grounds, and turn right into the fruit orchard where over a thousand trees have been planted by Le Conservatoire National des Pommes et des Poires (there are 379 varieties of apples and 247 varieties of pears growing here; some extremely rare, even biblical cultivars). Choose the path veering off to the left in between the fruit tree paddocks and you’ll soon begin to hear the distinct sound of buzzing bees. You have found the one and only Paris Beekeeping School.





Nearly a million bees are foraging around the seventeen hives of the Rucher du Luxembourg (rucher meaning apiary). Each year they produce about 450 pounds of honey, which is collected and sold every Autumn at the Orangerie du Luxembourg, just a few minutes walk up the garden path.





The 19th century pavilion with its surrounding wooden hives is a charming site to stumble upon, particularly when the beekeepers are out tending to the apiary. But if your curiosity goes a little further, perhaps you might be interested in becoming a Parisian beekeeper.





The first beekeeping school in Paris began with the creation of the Beekeeping Society back in 1856, founded by a librarian and teacher by the name of Henri Hamet. He is considered as the “father of French beekeeping”. His apiary accommodated up to twenty bee colonies and he pretty much wrote the handbook on beekeeping, which has been republished 10 times since his death. 


Clancy's comment: Wow. Who would have known, eh?

I'm ...










11 December 2019 - THE ANTONINE WALL - A SCAR OF THE ROMANS


THE ANTONINE WALL
 - A SCAR OF THE ROMANS -

G'day folks,

Scotland still bears an enormous scar of its Roman past. 

 

An unusual line stretches across Scotland’s Central Belt. It may look like no more than a strange scar speckled with clusters of stone structures, but it’s actually a remnant from when the Romans invaded the British Isles.

 

  

It’s a commonly held misconception that the Romans never reached Scotland and that their endeavors to conquer the entire British Isles stopped at Hadrian’s Wall in England. But not only did the Romans reach Scotland, they also built a massive turf wall to keep the Scottish tribes out of their southern territory.





Under the orders of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius, construction of this massive undertaking began in the year 142 and took 12 years to complete. The final work spans 39 miles from Old Kilpatrick on the Firth of Clyde to Carriden on the Firth of Forth. Bar Hill marks the highest point along the length of the wall at 250 meters (820 feet).




But after numerous attacks and greater problems at home in Rome, the wall was abandoned after only eight years. An attempt to re-establish occupation in 208 began with repairs to the wall, but ended only a few years later.

Time has not been kind to the abandoned wall, and much of the barrier and its forts have disappeared due to weathering and decay. However, what is left is protected and is now a UNESCO World Heritage site. Whether it’s a simple scar in the land or the foundations of an ancient bathhouse, all these ruins are worth exploring.



Clancy's comment: Mm ... I'd love to be sitting on a cloud, watching life,  just for a day during these times. 

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10 December 2019 - A COLLECTION OF INSPIRING QUOTES





A COLLECTION OF 
INSPIRING QUOTES

G'day folks,

We all need to be inspired. Let's hope some of these do just that.
























Clancy's comment: Pass them on. There must be someone you know who needs these.

I'm ...